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Contemporary Politics

Contemporary Politics

  • Anti-Vietnam: Silk-Screened Poster: Nixon
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    Year: 1969

    Size: 18 x 24 7/8 inches

    That the American involvement in the Vietnam War spawned a myriad of protests is hardly a secret. It was the dawning of a new age of questioning, when it became apparent that perhaps one’s government might not be functioning to serve the interests of the majority, but rather to cater to a gluttonous, fearful few. And in the tried and true old friend of disseminating dissenting viewpoints—the poster—the opposition movement found a powerful graphic voice. This skilk-screend poster is part of a series done by students at Rhode Island School of Design in opposition to the war in Vietnam.

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  • McCarthy/Peace.
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    Ben Shahn

    McCarthy/Peace.

    $500.00

    Year: 1968.

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    When Eugene McCarthy ran for President in 1968 against Lyndon Johnson, his candidacy was based upon his opposition to the war in Vietnam. As a prominent pacifist, Shahn was the perfect artist to create a campaign poster for McCarthy, the patriotically-colored dove promoting peace at last.

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  • Evergreen
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    Sergei Ivanov

    Evergreen

    $80.00

    Year: 1967

    Size: 29.5 x 45 inches

    For Evergreen's May 1967 issue, the counter culture journal came up with a poster within a poster, using Ivanov's festive 1920 May-Day image of a white-clad maiden scattering roses over the heads of the proletariat. The Cyrillic text above the design is explained below: "In Russia it means, Join The Underground!"

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  • Evergreen - Join the Underground.
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    Tomi Ungerer

    Evergreen - Join the Underground.

    $300.00

    Year: 1967.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Grove Press publisher Barney Rosset began Evergreen Review in 1957 as a literary quarterly featuring the likes of Sartre, Camus and Beckett as well as American poets Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Jack Kerouac. By 1966, the publication had increased its frequency and become a voice of political iconoclasm, so graphic designer John Alcorn refreshed its look, dropping "review" from the title in the process. Heralding the redesign was a new advertising campaign : "Join The Underground." Here, a poster for the February 1967 number utilizes cover artwork by noted illustrator and satirist Tomi Ungerer: a coolie-hatted image of Uncle Sam, sunk in the quagmire of Vietnam and displeased with the face he presents to the mirror.

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  • Stop! / Si al dicvieto dei minareti
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    Alexander Segert

    Stop! / Si al dicvieto dei minareti

    $200.00

    Quite possibly the most powerful poster of the past decade–or perhaps longer–which cuts through all the clutter and demonstrates just what xenophobic propaganda can accomplish. As stated in an article by Michael Kimmelman in the New York Times on Sunday, January 10, 2010, “Switzerland stunned many Europeans, including not a few Swiss, when . . . the country, by referendum, banned the building of minarets . . . A poster was widely cited as having galvanized votes for the Swiss measure, but was also blamed for exacerbating hostility towards immigrants . . . [The poster] used minarets rising from the Swiss flag like missiles . . . Beside the missiles a woman glowers from inside a niqab. ‘Stop’ is written below in big, fire-engine-red letters. The obvious message: Minarets lead to Sharia law. Never mind that there are only four minarets in Switzerland to begin with . . . It may be hard for Americans to grasp the role these images can play [in Europe]. In subways and on the streets of America, posters and billboards are eye-catching if sexy or stylish . . . but they’re basically background noise.  By contrast, they’re treated more seriously [in Switzerland], as news, at least when they’re political Molotov cocktails. Cheap to produce . . . and easy to spread in small countries like Switzerland, where referendums are catnip to populists, they have the capacity to rise above the general noise.” Segert is the manager of Goal, the cynical public relations firm for the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party, currently the leading political party in Switzerland. Hand-signed by the artist.

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  • Stop!/ Si Al Divieto dei Minareti
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    Alexander Segert

    Stop!/ Si Al Divieto dei Minareti

    $0.00

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    Quite possibly the most powerful poster of the past decade–or perhaps longer–which cuts through all the clutter and demonstrates just what xenophobic propaganda can accomplish. As stated in an article by Michael Kimmelman in the New York Times on Sunday, January 10, 2010, “Switzerland stunned many Europeans, including not a few Swiss, when . . . the country, by referendum, banned the building of minarets . . . A poster was widely cited as having galvanized votes for the Swiss measure, but was also blamed fort exacerbating hostility towards immigrants . . . [The poster] used minarets rising from the Swiss flag like missiles . . . Beside the missiles a woman glowers from inside a niqab. ‘Stop’ is written below in big, fire-engine-red letters. The obvious message: Minarets lead to Sharia law. Never mind that there are only four minarets in Switzerland to begin with . . . It may be hard for Americans to grasp the role these images can play [in Europe]. In subways and on the streets of America, posters and billboards are eye-catching if sexy or stylish . . . but they’re basically background noise.  By contrast, they’re treated more seriously [in Switzerland], as news, at least when they’re political Molotov cocktails. Cheap to produce . . . and easy to spread in small countries like Switzerland, where referendums are catnip to populists, they have the capacity to rise above the general noise.” Segert is the manager of Goal, the cynical public relations firm for the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party, currently the leading political party in Switzerland. Hand-signed by the artist.

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  • Darfur / Who Cares?
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    Dan Reisinger

    Darfur / Who Cares?

    $100.00

    Year: 2007

    Size: 27 x 39 inches

    A majority of Americans have either read about or seen the televised carnage in Darfur. Posters Please was looking for an opportunity to contribute to the alleviation of the suffering of the people in that region. To that end, we have commissioned a poster by one of the world’s most illustrious graphic artists, Dan Reisinger to help spread the word of the humaitarian aid so desperately needed in that region. 200 copies of the poster were printed in Israel. This design is a gift from the artist. Dan’s poster asks, “Who Cares?” The answer must be: “We all do.” This is a limited-edition poster.

    We hope that you will help us to make a difference—-it’s a small step, but one that we should all take.

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