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Counterculture '60s & '70s

Counterculture '60s & '70s

  • Anti-Vietnam: Silk-Screened Poster: Leave the Fear of Red to Horned Beasts
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    Year: 1969

    Printed in 1968 by students at the Rhode Island School of Design, this poster is part of a series created to protest the Vietnam War. This particular poster features a raging bull with the quote "leave the fear of red to horned beasts" written below. Supplies were donated by concerned supporters and the students ultimately made 8 posters in the series. They were sold for a few dollars that year, many being hung around college campuses and really wherever the students could slap them onto a wall. A complete collection of this series is held in the Library of Congress and is considered to be one of the more important examples of young activism in our country's history. This is an EXCEPTIONALLY RARE poster.

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  • Anti-Vietnam: Silk-Screened Poster: Nixon
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    Year: 1969

    Size: 18 x 24 7/8 inches

    That the American involvement in the Vietnam War spawned a myriad of protests is hardly a secret. It was the dawning of a new age of questioning, when it became apparent that perhaps one’s government might not be functioning to serve the interests of the majority, but rather to cater to a gluttonous, fearful few. And in the tried and true old friend of disseminating dissenting viewpoints—the poster—the opposition movement found a powerful graphic voice. This skilk-screend poster is part of a series done by students at Rhode Island School of Design in opposition to the war in Vietnam.

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  • Anti-Vietnam: Silk-Screened Poster: Is this the American Way?
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    Year: 1969

    Size: 24 3/4 x 17 3/4 inches

    Printed in 1968 by students at the Rhode Island School of Design, this poster is part of a series created to protest the Vietnam War. This particular poster features a gas-masked anonymous person, with the quote "Is this the American Way" reading below. Supplies were donated by concerned supporters and the students ultimately made 8 posters in the series. They were sold for a few dollars that year, many being hung around college campuses and really wherever the students could slap them onto a wall. A complete collection of this series is held in the Library of Congress and is considered to be one of the more important examples of young activism in our country's history. 

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  • Anti-Vietnam: Silk-Screened Poster: Peace is not healthy for generals and other killing things
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    Year: 1969

    Size: 18 x 24 7/8 inches

    Printed in 1968 by students at the Rhode Island School of Design, this poster is part of a series created to protest the Vietnam War. This particular poster features the saying "Peace is not healthy for generals and other killing things." Supplies were donated by concerned supporters and the students ultimately made 8 posters in the series. They were sold for a few dollars that year, many being hung around college campuses and really wherever the students could slap them onto a wall. A complete collection of this series is held in the Library of Congress and is considered to be one of the more important examples of young activism in our country's history.

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  • Anti-Vietnam: Silk-Screened Poster: America?
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    Year: 1969

    Size: 18 x 24 7/8 inches

    Printed in 1968 by students at the Rhode Island School of Design, this poster is part of a series created to protest the Vietnam War. This particular poster features a gun/knife raised to the sky with the word America? written across the top. Supplies were donated by concerned supporters and the students ultimately made 8 posters in the series. They were sold for a few dollars that year, many being hung around college campuses and really wherever the students could slap them onto a wall. A complete collection of this series is held in the Library of Congress and is considered to be one of the more important examples of young activism in our country's history. This is an EXCEPTIONALLY RARE poster.

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  • Booth’s Gin
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    Seymour Chwast

    Booth’s Gin

    $300.00

    Year: 1965

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Printed around 1965, this poster advertises Booth's Gin, asking the viewer to "Protest Against the Rising Tide of Conformity." The lower text reads "Serve Booth's House of Lords, the non-conformist gin from England."

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  • Evergreen - Join the Underground.
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    Tomi Ungerer

    Evergreen - Join the Underground.

    $300.00

    Year: 1967.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Grove Press publisher Barney Rosset began Evergreen Review in 1957 as a literary quarterly featuring the likes of Sartre, Camus and Beckett as well as American poets Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Jack Kerouac. By 1966, the publication had increased its frequency and become a voice of political iconoclasm, so graphic designer John Alcorn refreshed its look, dropping "review" from the title in the process. Heralding the redesign was a new advertising campaign : "Join The Underground." Here, a poster for the February 1967 number utilizes cover artwork by noted illustrator and satirist Tomi Ungerer: a coolie-hatted image of Uncle Sam, sunk in the quagmire of Vietnam and displeased with the face he presents to the mirror.

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  • Premio Casa De Las Americas 1973
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    ANONYMOUS

    Premio Casa De Las Americas 1973

    $100.00

    Year: 1974

    Size: 26 1/4 x 40 inches

    Printed in 1974, it advertises the Premio Casa de Las Americas, and was printed in Cuba.

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  • Orejona / Sanseau
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    Nicolas Devil

    Orejona / Sanseau

    $80.00

    Year: 1974

    Size: 23 1/2 x 33 1/8 inches

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  • Who Has a Better Right to Oppose the War?
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    Richard Avedon and Marvin Israel

    Who Has a Better Right to Oppose the War?

    $300.00

    Year: 1969

    Size: 24 x 37 3/4 inches

    Published by the Student Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, this poster states that those who have been forced to fight in the war have the most right to oppose it.

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  • 10 Years to Go / The Magazine for Survival
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    Julien Koenig and Paul Posnik

    10 Years to Go / The Magazine for Survival

    $50.00

    Year: 1970

    Size: 46 x 30 inches

    This poster was created to advertise the magazine Ten Years to Go: The Magazine for Survival. Sadly, the magazine was never published, making this the only remaining evidence that it was ever going to happen. Frankly, now it's just a kitschy bit of humor for your wall.

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  • MUSE / A Non Nuclear Future
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    Jan Sawka

    MUSE / A Non Nuclear Future

    $80.00

    Year: 1979

    Size: 23 1/2 x 32 1/2 inches

    This poster promotes the need for a non-nuclear future and one of the first benefit concerts for the group Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE) held in Battery Park City, New York (at that time, still an unoccupied landfill). The concert's mission was to find greener energy sources.

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  • Take Care / Non-Nuclear Future
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    Paul Davis

    Take Care / Non-Nuclear Future

    $100.00

    Year: 1979

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    In 1979, MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) organized five sold-out concerts at Madison Square Garden in an effort to activate anti-nuclear legislation. 40 artists performed, including a reunited Crosby, Stills and Nash; Bruce Springsteen; Jackson Browne; Bonnie Raitt; and James Taylor. As part of their fundraising effort, MUSE invited four famous New York City-based artists to create anti-nuclear or safe energy posters to be sold during the concerts. Unfortunately, the elaborate printing process was not completed until weeks after the event, and the posters were left in storage to be forgotten—until now. Paul Davis' solemn interpretation recalls early American paintings by artists like Grant Wood—but made contemporary with the clean border and typeface.

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  • FREE
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    Herbert Brown

    FREE

    $100.00

    Year: 1974

    Size: 30 x 30 inches

    Based on the famous LOVE sculpture in New York City, this poster expresses a similar idea--the simple necessity of freedom. You can interpret this however you like.

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  • Sansui Lives / Viva Vario Matrix!
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    Jacqui Morgan

    Sansui Lives / Viva Vario Matrix!

    $50.00

    Year: 1973

    Size: 24 x 33 inches

    This poster advertises the Japanese electronics manufacturer Sansui's QS Vario Matrix. "Sansui developed the QS Regular Matrix system, which made it possible to transmit four channel Quadraphonic sound from a standard LP. The channel separation was only 3 dB, but because of the human way of hearing it sounded relatively good. In 1973, Sansui introduced the more advanced QS Vario Matrix decoder with 20 dB separation." - Wikipedia

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  • Come Alive / Join the Underground Generation (Allen Ginsberg Evergreen)
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  • Viva Chavez.
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    Paul Davis

    Viva Chavez.

    $300.00

    Year: 1968.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    In order to invoke the bitter and prolonged strike of the California grape pickers against repressive working conditions, Davis painted an emblematic portrait of a young laborer. The name of Cesar Chavez, embattled head at the time of the United Farm Workers in Delano, California, was added to announce a concert at New York City’s Carnegie Hall benefiting the cause. Support for the inflammatory issue not only lowered grape consumption in the United states, but resulted in International Grape Boycott Day on May 10, 1969.

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  • Great Ideas of Western Man / Marcus Aurelius Antonius on One World.
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    Year: 1970.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    The "Great Ideas of Western Man” series, produced by Container Corporation of America, represents one of the truly distinguished advertising campaigns ever launched by an American corporation. Each poster is built around quote from a major Western thinker, interpreted by a prominent contemporary artist. Here, renowned Swiss artist Erni calligraphically portrays Roman emperor and Stoic
    philosopher Marcus Aurelius within a circle representing the globe.

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  • McCarthy/Peace.
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    Ben Shahn

    McCarthy/Peace.

    $500.00

    Year: 1968.

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    When Eugene McCarthy ran for President in 1968 against Lyndon Johnson, his candidacy was based upon his opposition to the war in Vietnam. As a prominent pacifist, Shahn was the perfect artist to create a campaign poster for McCarthy, the patriotically-colored dove promoting peace at last.

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  • Together with McGovern.
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    Paul Davis

    Together with McGovern.

    $100.00

    Year: 1972.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Here, Davis portrays presidential candidate George McGovern as a populist surrounded by Americans of every age and stripe to emphasize his appeal as a healing force in the Vietnam War. McGovern ran as the Democratic candidate against Republican Richard Nixon and was badly defeated.

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  • Getting it All Together / McGovern
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    Paul Bacon

    Getting it All Together / McGovern

    $100.00

    Year: 1972.

    Size: 25 x 38 in inches

    In the 1960s and '70s, designer Paul Bacon teamed up with photographer Paul Weller and Alix Nelson to create a dozen or so posters dealing with environmental themes. This political poster made for George McGovern's unsuccessful presidential run against Republican candidate Richard Nixon was not a commission, but something that the three wanted to do, and they published it privately to help the campaign. The image is a fabric construction showing the American flag in the process of being assembled out of canvas-strips of red and white, a blue rectangle and white stars. The ornate script in the center instantaneously evokes the U. S. Constitution while it reinforces McGovern's image as a post-Vietnam healer. After starting his career designing jazz album covers, Bacon has gone on to become one of the most widely recognized book-jacket designers in the country.

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  • Evergreen
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    Sergei Ivanov

    Evergreen

    $80.00

    Year: 1967

    Size: 29.5 x 45 inches

    For Evergreen's May 1967 issue, the counter culture journal came up with a poster within a poster, using Ivanov's festive 1920 May-Day image of a white-clad maiden scattering roses over the heads of the proletariat. The Cyrillic text above the design is explained below: "In Russia it means, Join The Underground!"

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  • Bread and Roses.
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    Paul Davis

    Bread and Roses.

    $200.00

    Year: 1978.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    In 1912, James Oppenheim commemorated the struggle of striking textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts with a poem inspired by a banner carried by young women mill hands. The banner read, "We want bread and roses, too," affirming the biblical adage, "Man does not live by bread alone." Set to music by Mimi Farina and recorded by Judy Collins, the poem found new meaning in the 70s. The theme was adopted by New York's District 1199 of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees for an unprecedented two-year project celebrating the arts and humanities that remains an annual event. With more than 70% of the district membership's being black or Hispanic, and almost 85% women, Davis chose an unidentified beautiful young black woman as his model. His painting of her, garlanded with wheat stalks and roses, became an icon of the period.

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  • Leonard Crow Dog.
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    Paul Davis

    Leonard Crow Dog.

    $200.00

    Year: 1977.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    The image of Leonard Crow Dog, Sioux medicine man and prominent figure in the Native American community, advertises a documentary film concerning Sioux grievances with the U.S. government after the shameful violence of Wounded Knee. Accented with Davis' trademark stencil lettering, the portrait is full of dignity and silent outrage – a superb addition to his gallery of proud faces.

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