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Music / Opera

Music / Opera

  • The Supremes / Lincoln Center
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    Joe Eula

    The Supremes / Lincoln Center

    $400.00

    Year: 1965.

    Size: 25 x 38 1/8 inches

    While best known for his fashion plates, Eula also created a variety of nightlife and concert images. Here, he depicts the legendary Supremes for their sold-out show at Lincoln Center.

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  • Stevie Wonder & Hugh Masakela.
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    Milton Glaser

    Stevie Wonder & Hugh Masakela.

    $300.00

    Year: 1968

    Size: 23 x 37 inches

    In this announcement for a concert at Lincoln Center's Philharmonic Hall, Glaser's stylized portrait of the revered rock-and-roll singer features his trademark wide smile and his name on the diagonal over his dark shades. Glaser also created a poster for jazz musician Masakela's solo appearance at Philharmonic Hall around the same time.

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  • Herbie Mann.
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    Avi Farin

    Herbie Mann.

    $100.00

    Year: 1979.

    Size: 22 x 34 inches

    Israeli-born Farin painted a series of about ten images for Art d'Lugoff's Village Gate, the crowded, smoky Greenwich Village haven to jazz musicians and aficionados alike. The same year that he created a design for Dizzy Gillespie appearing at the downtown jazz den, the appearance of jazz flautist Herbie Mann at the Village Gate put Farin in a mystical mood. He places the musician against a backdrop of earth and sky and inspires him with the light of a guiding star -- an image both warm and serene that evokes Mann's playing perfectly.

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  • Bossa Nova do Brasil
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    GUNTHER KIESER

    Bossa Nova do Brasil

    $200.00

    Year: 1966

    Size: 33 x 47 inches

    Keiser's extraordinary posters are the result of creating images from solid forms, like sculpture or collage, which he then photographs. A great music lover, he was fortunate to become associated with impresarios determined to expand Germany's festivals and concerts beyond old world sounds. He more than met the challenge. Here, his photograph of an open black hand painted with bright swirls suggests the exciting, seductive rhythms of the Carnival in Rio.

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  • Sixth International Harp Contest.
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    Dan Reisinger

    Sixth International Harp Contest.

    $200.00

    Year: 1976.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    In Israel, the land where David sang on his harp, Reisinger's abstraction of the instrument being played is another example of his ability to distill an idea to abstraction without losing any meaning. Dan Reisinger is Israel's top graphic artist. He established his own design studio in Tel Aviv in 1961 and began a prolific career as a poster artist and painter. In step with his country's dynamic development, Reisinger's design activities have expanded to include corporate entities, packaging, sign systems, supergraphics, exhibition and environmental design.

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  • Simon & Garfunkel.
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    Milton Glaser

    Simon & Garfunkel.

    $400.00

    Year: 1967.

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    Glaser has remarked that the way he illustrated the well-known folk-rock composer-singers here was, in a reverse of the usual process, influenced by the appearance of the typeface he used-his own "Babyfat" alphabet.

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  • Sansui Lives / Viva Vario Matrix!
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    Jacqui Morgan

    Sansui Lives / Viva Vario Matrix!

    $50.00

    Year: 1973

    Size: 24 x 33 inches

    This poster advertises the Japanese electronics manufacturer Sansui's QS Vario Matrix. "Sansui developed the QS Regular Matrix system, which made it possible to transmit four channel Quadraphonic sound from a standard LP. The channel separation was only 3 dB, but because of the human way of hearing it sounded relatively good. In 1973, Sansui introduced the more advanced QS Vario Matrix decoder with 20 dB separation." - Wikipedia

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  • Stan Getz / Dionne Warwick / Symphony Hall.
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    Year: 1969.

    Size: 23 x 35 inches

    Printed in 1969, it advertises the legendary performance of Dionne Warwick & Stan Getz.

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  • Bobby Short / The Bottom Line
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    Richard Marshall Merkin

    Bobby Short / The Bottom Line

    $200.00

    Year: 1976

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    Printed in 1976, it was created to promote the legendary cabaret performer Bobby Short at The Bottom Line.

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  • Temple University Music Festival
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    Milton Glaser

    Temple University Music Festival

    $175.00

    Year: 1975.

    Size: 24 x 35 inches

    The last in a trio of posters-this one commissioned by Mobil-that Glaser did for this concert series in Philadelphia. His Cubist portrait of a muse in profile shows her brow-cum-swan: in ancient literature, the symbol of Orpheus, the god of music.

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  • Tomato: Something Unusual is Going on Here.
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    Year: 1978.

    Size: 24 x 37 inches

    Glaser promotes the all-tape Tomato Music Company with this Surrealistic vision of a giant tomato, presumably listening to some of the namesake output of the company from the depths of a cozily upholstered chair after a hard day of oversized produce related shenanigans. The company roster included musicians of every manner and stripe-jazz, rock, avant-garde, vocal, instrumental-and the image of and overstuffed armchair crops up again and again in Glaser's work.

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  • The Loving Spoonful
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    Milton Glaser

    The Loving Spoonful

    $300.00

    Year: 1972.

    Size: 24 x 37 inches

    In a witty riff on the well-known Thomas Gainsborough portrait, Glaser portrays this pop-rock group responsible for such hits as "Do You Believe in Magic" and "Summer In The City" as a quartet of Blue Boys with their eponymous spoons instead of heads. Another Glaser addition: a final "g" on the group's name, which was customarily spelled "Lovin'."

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  • Sony Tape. Full Color Sound.
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    Milton Glaser

    Sony Tape. Full Color Sound.

    $200.00

    Year: 1980.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Using a theme line created by Sony's adverting agency at the time, Glaser designs a shellshaped ear in glorious colors to suggest the rich aural experience of listening to Sony audio tape. It's background: the profile of a 19th-century listener silhouetted against music notation paper. The poster pleased sufficiently to earn Glaser a follow-up commission in 1981.

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  • San Diego Jazz Festival
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    Milton Glaser

    San Diego Jazz Festival

    $200.00

    Year: 1983

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    A suit-and-sandal clad bear heralds this Pacific Coast event with a serenade at dusk. Several favorite Glaserisms show up here: the swirling contours, the loose cross-hatching and the sax.

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  • Poppy Gives Thanks.
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    Milton Glaser

    Poppy Gives Thanks.

    $300.00

    Year: 1968.

    Size: 24 x 37 inches

    Poppy was an unconventional '60s record company that Glaser had introduced with an image of a bright flower breaking through a stone monolith. Ironically, the company was so successful that it was ultimately sold to one of the established big companies it had positioned itself against. For this almost free concert of poppy recording artists (Townes Van Zandt, The Mandrake, Dick Gregory) taking place on Thanksgiving Eve at New York's Carnegie Hall ("$2.50-first come, first served"), Glaser continued the poppy motif with an engaging blossom-brained gobbler. The typeface-Neo-Futura-a stencil variation on the classic Bauhaus Futura alphabet-is only one of the many that he has created.

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  • Saratoga Festival
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    Milton Glaser

    Saratoga Festival

    $200.00

    Year: 1980.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    For this annual summer arts festival held in upstate New York, Glaser places a Pan figure on a hill overlooking a lake with dreamy fantasies of color and harmony bubbling out of his overheated brain. Glaser also used this satyr in a poster for the 1985 retrospective of his own work in Pasadena.

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  • The Russian Tea Room Welcomes the Newport Jazz Festival
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    Year: 1972

    Size: 24 x 37 inches

    Glaser's relationship with the Russian Tea Room, a landmark haunt next to New York's Carnegie Hall, began when owner Faith Gordon Stewart asked him to redesign the restaurant's logo and menus. A memorable program of graphic communications followed. This example celebrates the arrival of the Newport Jazz Festival-a summer series of jazz concerts, originally held in Newport, Rhode Island, that moved its venue to New York City around this time. Against a background of psychedelically-striped and checked candy pastels, the silhouetted figure of a Russian Cossack pours vodka into the throat of a saxophone to lubricate the player's performance.

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  • San Francisco Opera / First International Summer Festival.
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    Year: 1981

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    The poster for inaugural season of this event focuses on the opening work: the American premiere of Aribert Reimann's Lear directed by Jean-Pierre Ponnelle. Glaser's profile of the raging king is lit by the hellish fire in his eye-the face of his daughter Cordelia whom he thinks has betrayed him. Type placed on the diagonal echoes the contours of the emotional design.

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  • Juilliard.
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    Milton Glaser

    Juilliard.

    $200.00

    Year: 1991.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    Rarely has Cubism looked so engaging as in this image of a cello fellow bowing away—the fifth and final poster in Glaser’s TDK-sponsored series for Juilliard. The artist loves music, loves educational institutions, loves the shape of the cello—and it all shows

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  • Juilliard.
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    Milton Glaser

    Juilliard.

    $200.00

    Year: 1990.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    Beginning in 1987, the audio-tape manufacturer TDK underwrote a series of annual posters for the Juilliard School of Music at New York’s Lincoln Center. Glaser has designed them all. Here, in the fourth, the lightning power of music brings a carefully-painted Dutch floral still life into three-dimensional bloom.

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  • Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College.
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    Year: 1984.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    To celebrate the 30th anniversary of this cultural institution, Glaser creates music and dance incarnate: A colorful headless figure, its torso formed by a cello, casts a lyrical shadow on the stage.

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  • San Francisco Opera.
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    Milton Glaser

    San Francisco Opera.

    $200.00

    Year: 1981.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    To announce the company's 59th season, Glaser superimposes the head and torso of a sinuous Carmen on the erect back of the orchestra conductor. She's all flamboyant color, he's in tuxedo black, and the forms meld with electric results.

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  • Bach Variations.
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    Milton Glaser

    Bach Variations.

    $125.00

    Year: 1985.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    Commissioned for Bach's tricentennial, Glaser's punning poster is a series of portraits in different media on various papers. It's a virtuoso performance and was included in the "Milton Glaser on Music" exhibit at New York's Lincoln Center Gallery. The masterful photograph is by Matthew Klein.

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  • Bach/Joao Carlos Martins.
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    Milton Glaser

    Bach/Joao Carlos Martins.

    $200.00

    Year: 1989.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    Printed in 1989, it advertises the release of Bach's complete keyboard works on digital recording under the Tomato label.

    Because it's digital, Bach is shown here wearing a multi-colored Zoot Suit. Joao Carlos Martins, considered one of the world's most dynamic interpreters of Bach's keyboard repertory in the 1960s, was forced to quite playing in 1970s after a freack soccer accident. When he returned in 1979, he began this recording project but had to stop again, and at the time of this poster, had only resumed playing recently. In 1993, Martins was mugged, and a minor stroke paralyzed his right hand.

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