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NYC / Local Interest

NYC / Local Interest

  • A Chorus Line.
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    Paul Elson

    A Chorus Line.

    $50.00

    Year: 1978.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Elson's photograph of the Shubert Theater at night captures all the glitter of The Great White Way -- a perfect visual equivalent for the quintessential theatrical piece about the the gypsies who make up the heart and soul of New York's fabled musical stage. The poster doubtless contributed to the musical's then record-breaking Broadway run: 6,137 performances between October 1975 and April 1990.

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  • Wall St
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    Tomoko Miho

    Wall St

    $300.00

    Year: 1968

    Size: 29 5/8 x 44 7/8 inches

    In a smoggy shade of money-green, we see the towers of Wall Street just out before us. Composed out of stock ticker-tape, they are ever-changing and, ultimately, not real.

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  • Poppy Gives Thanks.
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    Milton Glaser

    Poppy Gives Thanks.

    $300.00

    Year: 1968.

    Size: 24 x 37 inches

    Poppy was an unconventional '60s record company that Glaser had introduced with an image of a bright flower breaking through a stone monolith. Ironically, the company was so successful that it was ultimately sold to one of the established big companies it had positioned itself against. For this almost free concert of poppy recording artists (Townes Van Zandt, The Mandrake, Dick Gregory) taking place on Thanksgiving Eve at New York's Carnegie Hall ("$2.50-first come, first served"), Glaser continued the poppy motif with an engaging blossom-brained gobbler. The typeface-Neo-Futura-a stencil variation on the classic Bauhaus Futura alphabet-is only one of the many that he has created.

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  • NOW
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    Dozier

    NOW

    $100.00

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    Dozier

    NOW

    $100.00

    Year: 1968

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    Printed in 1968, it was created to advertise the play Now. 

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  • Measure for Measure.
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    Paul Davis

    Measure for Measure.

    $200.00

    Year: 1976.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    Poster portraits of the play's two leads: a pensive Meryl Streep with late actor John Cazale glowing in the background. Between 1975 and 1991, Davis created 51 posters for the New York Public Theater, the organization responsible for the free summer performances of Shakespeare in Central Park's open-air Delacorte Theater.

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  • The Taming of the Shrew
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    Paul Davis

    The Taming of the Shrew

    $200.00

    Year: 1978

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    For this knockabout romantic comedy offered during the 22nd season of free summer Shakespeare, the sepia portraits of festival regulars Raul Julia as Petruchio and Meryl Streep as Kate are surprisingly serious. Between 1975 and 1991, Davis created 51 posters for the New York Public Theater, the organization responsible for the free summer performances of Shakespeare in Central Park's open-air Delacorte Theater.

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  • Partnership for Change / New York Model Cities.
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    Year: 1968.

    Size: 29 1/2 x 45 inches

    Decades before Jesse Jackson coined the phrase ‘rainbow coalition’ to express the idea of cultural pluralism, Miho visualized this redevelopment program with a series of rainbow-hued squares, each containing the symbol of a black/white handshake of mutual goals, respect, and action.

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  • Christo Jeanne-Claude Wrap Whitney Museum
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    Year: 1971

    30 x 46 inches

    This is an ORIGINAL FIRST PRINTING of this poster by the artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude.

    Back in the 1970s there was a proposed project that the artist wrap the Whitney Museum, as he had wrapped so many famous buildings before (and since). Although these posters were made to advertise the event from his sketches, the project was never realized.

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  • July 4th in Old New York
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    Griesbach-Martucci

    July 4th in Old New York

    $50.00

    Year: 1976

    Size: 24 x 37 inches

    Celebrating the bicentennial, this poster announces the 4th of July celebration in New York City.

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  • The New School
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    Edward Sorel

    The New School

    $200.00

    Year: 1979

    Size: 24 x 34 inches

    Printed in 1979, it promotes The New School, a NYC-based university. Corresponding to the text "For a heart, courage, or a brain," we see drifting down from a hot air balloon the iconic characters of the Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, and the Tin Man from the Wizard of Oz. It is perfect for a children's bedroom or playroom. 

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  • Lincoln Center / New York
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    Giulio Citato

    Lincoln Center / New York

    $300.00

    Year: 1968

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    In 1968, the Container Corporation of America came out with a series of posters entitled 'Aspects of New York City.' They were hung in parks, subways, neighborhood clubs, and churches with the goal of improving the quality of the city's public surroundings. Today, the ten-poster series is known as one of the most inventive and distinguished public arts projects of the 20th century, with a complete set residing in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. These images appear in countless books on Modern Graphics and are highly valued amongst collectors. 

    This is an ORIGINAL FIRST PRINTING from that series, meant to represent Lincoln Center. Designed by Giulio Cittato, this poster is one of the most graphically simple in the series, creating the essence of a ballet dancer out of the over-exposed arch of her movements. 
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  • Harlow’s Discotheque
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    McDaniels

    Harlow’s Discotheque

    $300.00

    Year: ca. 1969.

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    Only at New York’s most exciting Discotheque could a 1920s flapper tango with a Spanish guitarist.

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  • Harlem / New York / 125th Street
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    Peter Treubner

    Harlem / New York / 125th Street

    $400.00

    Year: 1968

    Size: 29 3/8 x 44 7/8 inches

    Cutting across northern Manhattan from river to river is Harlem's main drag: 125th Street. The jazzy night photo is cut into a giant "H" that showcases the area's bright lights and historic Apollo Theater.

     

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  • The Mod Ball / The Rainbow Room
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    Joe Eula

    The Mod Ball / The Rainbow Room

    $300.00

    Year: 1965.

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    The dancing miniskirted figure is a superb example of the loose, evocative illustrative style that made Eula highly sought after by fashion and theatrical clients alike during New York's go-go 1960s and 70s. This dance-til-dawn event was a production of the Cercle d'Or Club, run by Olivier Coquelin, the high-octane Frenchman who single-handedly created the city's discotheque scene in those years. Coquelin's establishments included Le Club, Hippopotamus and Cheetah.

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  • Give Your City a Heart!
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    Ernst Lurker

    Give Your City a Heart!

    $50.00

    Year: 1978.

    Size: 30 x 45 inches

    This poster depicting a giant red heart adorning the top of One Times Square-the geographic center of New York City-epitomizes the spirit of "I Love New York" born during the festive, fervent mayorship of John V. Lindsay. Lurker's ultimate hope was to paint his valentine to the city as a mural on the tower's white marble facade. He published this poster as an "in-progress documentary" showing how the work would look at several steps along the way. The poster was sold in city bookstores and souvenir shops, much to the puzzlement of natives and the disappointment of tourists who couldn't find the real deal. Lurker was born in Ulm, Germany, and received his education in Stuttgart, Hamburg and the University of Kansas. Since 1968, he has worked in New York as a sculptor and designer of kinetic works. His reputation has won him commissions from many museums throughout the world including New York's Museum of Modern Art, and his giant play-sculptures were featured prominently on the site of the 1972 Olympics in Munich.

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  • Mostly Mozart Festival / Lincoln Center
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    Milton Glaser

    Mostly Mozart Festival / Lincoln Center

    $150.00

    Year: 1983.

    Size: 24 x 36 inches

    Glaser titles this pastel-colored mini-movie "Mozart Sneezes." The irreverent nine-frame sequence captures the bad-boy genius of Leipzig in a personal, nonmusical moment. Truly inspired.

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  • Bacall and the Boys / Paris.
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    Joe Eula

    Bacall and the Boys / Paris.

    $300.00

    Year: 1968.

    Size: 25 x 38 inches

    What better way to while away a hot pre-Labor Day Saturday night than by watching Lauren Bacall present a preview of the Fall Paris fashion collections? The hour-long network television presentation was a joint production of Eula himself and fashion photographer Milton Greene. Eula shows the feline Bacall flanked by designers Yves St. Laurent (Behind shades), Emanuel Ungaro, Marc Bohan (for the house of Dior) and Pierre Cardin. For fashion followers, Bacall's slinky hot-pink, bell-bottom jumpsuit instantly captures the period. The poster design is by Bea Feitler -- one of Milton Glaser's many proteges who have become brilliant graphic designers in their own right. She set Eula's artwork off with Art Nouveau-mod typography by Dewey Seid.

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