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ANONYMOUS

Burroughs Additions Maschinen

$1,700.00

ANONYMOUS

Burroughs Additions Maschinen

$1,700.00

Condition: A

At first glance, it appears as if the anonymous artist commissioned to provide promotional material for the Burroughs Class 2, high-keyboard adding machine has given us a cutaway view in order to better appreciate the inner-workings of the banking and business staple. However, the construction of these machines included glass sides that allowed the mechanism to be seen and appreciated by buyers. As a bank clerk in Auburn, New York, William Seward Burroughs (1857-1898) became convinced that banks needed a machine that would add figures accurately and print entries and sums. In 1882, he moved to St. Louis, took a job in a machine shop, and began tinkering. By 1891, he had several patents and an adding machine sufficiently reliable for use in banks. It was sold by a firm called American Arithmometer Company, later renamed Burroughs. The Burroughs Corporation would remain an active manufacturer of calculating machines and then computers. In the 1980s it merged with Sperry Univac to form Unisys. And in conclusion, a final bit of trivia: the term "T Totaller," used to describe a formal, precise person who stays away from the consumption of alcohol, originates from bankers who used the Burroughs Class 2 machines, which had a key on the keyboard that was marked "T Total.